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  CSPAN    Politics Public Policy Today    News/Business.  

    December 18, 2012
    1:00 - 5:59am EST  

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ok. is there a second to such motion? hearing a second, all those in favor of closing the nominations for vice-president of the united states, please signify by saying aye. the ayes have it. the nominations are closed. the balloting will proceed for the vice-president of the united states of america. will the vice presidential please ask the amount. electors, please mark your ballot in writing for vice president, and please do not forget to sign your ballot.
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will the vice presidential teller please collect the ballots from the electors hammon?
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>> the electoral votes of north carolina have been passed on this, the 17th day of december, 2012, through the republican electors, and the result is as follows. votes cast in the name of paul ryan. >> thank you. with secretary marshall please bring forth the certificates to
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vote. each elector or will have to sign six copies. i believe we are going to sign one copy, and if at the end the electors will remain seated, we will sign the other five copies.
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>> the electors having signed a certificate of the vote, at this point i would like to thank the staff of the state capital, the secretary of state's office, and the north carolina republican's staff as well as the north carolina republican party as well as the voters of north carolina for helping make this meeting of the electoral college of success. if there is no further business to come before us, i wish to recognize dodi allen for the purpose of making a motion to adjourn. >> [inaudible] >> recognizing john abernathy --
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don abernathy for the purpose of a second. >> [inaudible] >> all those in favor of adjournment, say aye. >> aye. >> i now turn it over to our distinguished secretary of state, alain marshall. >> thank you for a job well done. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your service today. i want to thank the participants as well as those of you here to watch history being made. history in this historical room and people watching us across the state through modern technology, this is truly a moment to reflect upon what good
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citizenship is all about. before everybody does start to leave, let me remind the electorates, if i can ask you to return to your seat so we can pass those extra five. they are crucial and have to be sent to washington post case for archives and congress and everywhere else -- posthaste for our cars and congress and everyone else. thank you very much to everyone. i hope you have enjoyed yourself, making history, as we have. >> today the 18 members of ohio 's electro college pass their votes for president barack obama -- now ohio possible electoral college -- of ohio's elecroral
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college passed their votes for president barack obama. courtesy of the ohio channel, this is 40 minutes. >> this is the 53rd meeting of the ohio electoral college. i would like to thank you for coming and welcome you to these procedures. i would like all who are gathered here today to stand for a moment of silent prayer or reflection for the victims, their families and our country as we mourn the deaths of the children and school officials in newtown, connecticut. >> thank you. to lead us through the taiex thank you. to lead us through the
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preliminary matters and to provide us with a welcoming address, i would like to pass the gavel to congresswoman elect, joyce beatty. >> thank you very much, secretary husted. we begin with an innovation. at this time i would like to ask the reverend angela simmons to please come up. let us pray. almighty god, we gather here together today as people from many different faith traditions, yet we share a bond that is deep and enduring, a profound and abiding belief in justice and peace for all of your
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children. from the rolling hills of new england to the sunny beaches of california and beyond even the borders of this hallowed land. together today we meet to celebrate this democracy, lord, with which you have blessed us and we assemble to cast the votes that will elect the next president of these united states of america. we pray that each person casting a vote does so with a pure mind, heart, and soul seeking the very best and the highest good for the people of this great nation, economic stability, moral integrity, and the ability to lead the world as a true example of freedom and fairness.
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we pray for the president, that he may be strengthened daily by your grace, that he may constantly remember his calling as both a leader for and a servant of the people and that we, the citizens of these united states, those who have elected him might be his ever constant source of encouragement as he seeks to fulfill his duties and obligations. and finally, lord, we ask you to inspire all those who have been entrusted to elected office, that they may search deep within their hearts and find the way to work with one another and with the president for the good of this country, the world, and the children who come after us. amen.
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>> amen. please remain standing as the columbus police honor guard now presents the colors. at this time i would like to ask state senator nina turner to come forward and lead us in
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reciting the pledge of allegiance. >> good afternoon. will you all join me. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america. and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. >> and finally, please remain standing for our national anthem which will be sung by miss debbie parker and, please, feel free to join in. >> ♪ o, say can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming? whose broad stripes
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and bright stars through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts the watched were so gallantly streaming? and the rockets' red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there o, say, does that start-spangled banner yet wave o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? ♪
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[applause] >> thank you, and you may be seated. >> good afternoon. it is with great pride that i stand here in these chambers to
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welcome you as we convene our 53rd meeting of the ohio electoral college. to all of our state elected officials, members of the electoral college, guests, and those viewing the proceedings today, i thank you for joining us. today, members of the ohio electoral college will cast their vote to elect the president of these united states. as designed by our founding fathers and framed in the constitution, each state is awarded electoral votes by the number of congressional members. today i stand in this well being honored as one of those to serve in the united states congress. two additional members will have the honor of providing ohio the privilege to cast 18 electoral
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college votes in favor of the candidate who won our state's general election. as citizens of this great state, our views, our opinions are valuable, and our 18 electoral college votes helped decide who becomes the president of the united states and who does not. as a citizen of this date, i am so proud to call ohio home, where i join the 11 million other citizens, the citizens from 241 cities, 681 villages, and more than 1300 townships. ohio is called the mother of presidents. it is the home of eight great ohioans who have become president of these united states -- presidents william henry
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harrison, benjamin harrison, william mckinley, william howard taft, james abrams garfield, warren harding, ulysses s. grant, and rutherford hayes. it is my pleasure today to state that today ohio's electoral college members will cast their votes to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution, federal law, and ohio law all have called on this group of individuals who will organize themselves as the ohio elector college, according to the ohio revised code. it specifies the secretary of state shall convene the electoral college.
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so i will now pass the gavel back to the secretary of state, secretary jon husted. >> thank you, congresswoman- elect beatty. one of the traditions of democracy is the orderly transition of power, or in this case, the retention of it. this orderly transition of power, particularly as it relates to the power of the presidency, makes america great and unique. it is a tradition that has withstood the test of time, and it is an honor for me and for all of us to play our role in this perspective chapter of our
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state's history. as required by law, all electors have been notified of the time and place of this meeting. electors had until noon to appear at this meeting of the electoral college, and it should reflect that the time now is 12:12 p.m. therefore, the first order of official business will be to call the roll to ascertain if all members are present. i now ask connie pillich to call the roll of electors. >> present. >> here. >> present.
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>> present. >> present. >> here, ma'am. >> present. >> present. >> here. >> present. >> i beg your pardon, mr. elector. >> present. >> here. >> present. >> present. >> present. >> present. >> present. >> present.
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>> mr. secretary, all electoral members are present. >> i ask maureen o'connor, chief justice of the ohio supreme court, to come forward and administer the oath of office to the members of this electoral college. >> thank you, and, of course, i asked you to stand and raise your right hand. if you will repeat after me -- i -- please state your name -- do solemnly swear that i will support, obey, and to defend the constitution of the united
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states and the constitution and laws of the state of ohio and that i will faithfully discharge the duties of my office as i shall answer unto god. congratulations. >> thank you. i will now entertain nominations for the chairman of the 53rd ohio electoral college. i will now call on the gentleman. >> mr. secretary, i nominate chris redfern. >> are there any other nominations? >> i move that nominations for chairman be closed. >> it has been moved that nominations for the chairman be closed. is there a second?
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>> i second the nomination to be closed. >> kevin seconded the motion that nominations be closed. all in favor signify by saying aye. those opposed? the ayes have it. all are in favor of chris redfern being chairman of the 53rd ohio elector college. chairman, please come forward to except the ceremonial gavel and preside over the meeting. >> thank you, secretary husted, and welcome.
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this historic election, the first to be carried by a democrat twice in ohio by more than 50% of the vote since franklin delano roosevelt, reflects the effort, work, diligence of those present and properly of those not present. to our friends in the campaign, thank you for your leadership. to those who supported our efforts all across this important state, thank you for your support. i would like to recognize members of the senate and house leadership today as well as the members of the general assembly present. i would like to personally thank
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secretary husted. our effort continues beyond today. as we are reminded by the opening prayer, our effort begins anew. to all those present, congratulations. this historic day marks what the secretary of state so aptly pointed out, the retention of power and another four years for president obama. on behalf of the ohio democratic party and those who supported the campaign of the president, i simply say thank you. with that, i would like to recognize and bring to the podium the former governor of the state of ohio governor ted strickland. >> the scriptures remind us that god has not given us the spirit
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of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. our country faces many, many difficult challenges. we have witnessed the horror of recent days. we have been engaged in foreign wars. we have budget challenges that confront the leadership in washington even as we meet here today.
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but i believe this is a good day. i believe it is a good day because we are here to celebrate, as secretary husted indicated, we're here to celebrate a peaceful election that has resulted in the retention -- it could have been a transfer of power -- but we know in any event it would have been peaceful and accepted by the american people. that is our form of self- governance and one that we should honor and protect. last night i was thinking back over my own political career, and i realized that in my political time i have won seven elections and i have lost five elections. but i can tell you that on every election day in which i have been involved, regardless of the outcome, i have considered that event to be a magnificent event. the campaign for offices in our country, we spend money and run
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tv ads and make speeches, and then finally the people speak, and the people speak by collectively registering their opinions as to who they choose to have lead us, and that is magnificent, regardless of who is the winner or who is the loser. and that is why we are here today, to celebrate that, to cast our votes as electors. we should also remember, i believe, that we are one family in this great country of ours. we are black and white, we are brown, we are republicans and
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democrats. we are conservatives and liberals. we are gays and straights. we are from every part of this great country of ours, every region, small town, large city, rural areas. but there is something that binds the americans together that i believe is unique among the nations of the earth, and we are celebrating a part of that you need this today. and so, as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of a sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor
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strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary of state as the ex-officio secretary. >> i moved jon husted be designated as the ex-officio secretary of the 53rd electoral college. >> moving that mr. husted be designated. all those in favor by saying aye. opposed? ayes have it. mr. secretary, will you please return to the podium. we electors are about to cast our votes for president of the united states.
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the procedures are set forth in the 12th amendment of the united states constitution. separate votes are to be taken for each of us on separate ballots. after the votes have been cast and counted and the results announced, electors will sign six original copies stating the results. the secretary of the state's office has prepared certificates of votes in advance of this process. will you further explain the procedure we are to follow today. >> thank you. according to the 12th amendment, and section 3505.39 of the ohio code, each elector must vote separately. each will find the presidential ballot in their folders on their desks.
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each will sign their ballots at this time, and my staff will collect each ballot from each elector. please sign your presidential ballots in accordance with instructions. the secretary's staff will collect them and deliver them. to the tellers, i ask that you hold those ballots until electors cast their votes for the vice president.
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have the tellers collected all the votes? you may now sign all your vice- presidential ballots, after which they will be collected and given to the tellers.
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have all the ballots that collected? i would ask tellers proceed to counted the ballots, first for president, and then for vice
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president. upon the collection and accounting of the ballots, tellers will inform connie pillich and she will make the announcement. >> tellers determined that 18 votes had been cast for barack obama for president and 18 votes have been cast for joe biden for vice president. >> results of the tally are 18 votes for barack obama for president and 18 votes for joe biden for vice president. mr. secretary, please explain the procedure electors are to proceed with. >> title 3, chapter 1, of the united states code requires electors shall sign six
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certificates of all votes given by them. we have the six certificates of votes for you to sign on the table at the front of the chamber. these are the official certificates that must be forwarded to the president of the united states senate, the archivist of the united states, and united states district court, certifying that you have fulfilled your duties in electing the president and vice president at this electoral college. my staff will escort the electors to the tables. be sure to sign all six copies. electors will now sign these certificates of votes according to the secretary's instructions.
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>> all the certificates of vote being signed, i asked for a motion that they may be delivered into the keeping of the secretary of state, who will distribute them as required by law. is there a motion? >> i move that the signed certificates be delivered to the secretary for distribution as required by law. >> the motion has been offered. is there a second?
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>> second the motion. >> all in favor signify by saying aye. opposed? the motion carries, and the documents are delivered to the secretary of state, who will deliver them by law. i would like to thank everyone for participating in this august gathering and thank members of the 53rd ohio electoral college. i would ask that the closing benediction be delivered. reverend? >> please stand. the lord bless you and keep you, the lord make his face shine upon you and be gracious unto you, the lord look upon every one of you with favor, with god's peace. >> i move this meeting of the
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ohio electoral college be adjourned. >> is there a second? seconded. all in favor signify by saying aye. opposed to the hearing no objection, i declare the meeting of the 53rd ohio electoral college be adjourned. cracks as the electoral college met, we spoke with a social studies teacher about how she
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teaches the electoral process and uses keyspan as a resource at her school. -- uses c-span as a resource at her school. >> tracy is a high-school social studies and history teacher. she is currently a cease and senior fellow, and she is joining us on the phone. -- a c-span senior fellow, and she is joining us on the phone. what is your approach? >> the electoral college is something that is definitely challenging to students. they have heard of it before, and fortunately i have been using the like doral college map. it shows who got the votes in 2008. it has the new census figures,
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so i explained it in my unit. we talk about the fact we do not directly elect the president. he or she is indirectly elected through the system, and we talk about how many votes each state gets, and the map provides a good visual, and the kids are very attentive, because this is not something they are familiar with. >> the lesson plan is also available along with some teachable videos. you can log on to c-span.org for more information. there is also the debate about whether it is still relevant. what kind of discussion with you have in the classroom? >> they do ask why do we have this system, and there are usually kids to think it should
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be changed. every year there has been talk about whether the vote winner will win in the electoral college and what that will do to the system. it would call it into question, and that has not happened since 2000, and we talk about the fact at as long as it still seems to work in the sense of the popular vote, there is a huge outcry against it, but there are certainly people on both sides of the issue, and things have changed since the founders created this, and they were really not sure your average americans should allow the president, so this is an indirect system they set up, and there is certainly an argument as to whether it still fits today. >> you are in an arbor, mich. in the state capital. why do we have this system? why did the founding fathers
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feel it is important we elect a president not through congress but through this electoral college system? >> i think they were not sure the average americans would really know who the candidates were, and there are certain people the electra oral who -- the electors would be more familiar with the emerging national politics. they thought there would be somebody like george washington all the time, and he was a consensus candidate, and he was elected president of everything, president of the united states, and they were not sure americans would have the information necessary to cast their votes. as they point out to their kids when they use to vote on the election day they would actually vote for the slate of electors, not necessarily the candidates, so they would vote for people they knew, like doris day new as opposed to the presidential candidates. >> we go to the seas?
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website. there is a lesson plan available to all of -- to the c-span website. there is a lesson plan available. what you find useful? >> they are wonderful. they fit perfectly into my ap curriculum. the units are organized. recently they have started doing bell ringer clips, so they are really brief clips you can show to spark conversation about important concept of government, and we senior fellows have also come up with a web site called classroom deliberations in which we have clips and newspaper articles about controversial issues and provide both sides for the students, and what is great about c-span is you get unfiltered information, and it shows all points of view, so it allows the students to learn what they can and become informed and make up their own minds. >> in using these videos, a
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dozen reenforce the discussion plans you bring into the classroom? we are talking about something that happened well over 200 years ago, and we have seen the electoral college meeting every two years and supplement that with these videos. does it help them grasp what is happening? >> in 2008 it was arizona and pennsylvania for you guys taped the electoral college beatings in the state capital, and i use pennsylvania as an example. i look forward to using 2012. even i did not have an idea of how it worked until i was able to use these videos. it is an unknown aspect of this process that it occurs today and in state capitals throughout the country. it was interesting the clip through pennsylvania. they made a couple of comments
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about how they were excited to vote for barack obama, so it is fun to see it in action. for visual learners there is no beating him. >> the president one n.c.. -- won north carolina. thanks for having us -- >> you are welcome. thank you for having me. >> reaction to the shooting in connecticut. that is followed by a the south carolina senator.
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leon panetta speaks of the national press club. secretary panetta will discuss the fed's policy and the challenges facing the u.s. military. who -- discusses defense policy and challenges facing the u.s. military. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with >> obesity in this country is nothing short of a public health crisis. >> it is only when somebody had their own agenda. >> so much influence. >> i think they serve as a
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window on the path to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante. >> many of the women were writers, journalists. they wrote books. >> they were more interesting as human beings in many cases than their husbands, if only because they are not first and form of reform most defined by political ambitions. >> dolly madison loves every minute of the. monroe hated it. >> you cannot rule without including what women want and what women have. you could not. >> breathless and too much looking down and it was a little too fast. not enough change of pace.
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>> yes, ma'am. >> she wrote in her memoir that she may never -- that she never made a decision. she only decided what was important and when to present it to her husband. you stop and think about how much power that is, it is a lot of power. >> the battle against cancer is to fight the fear that accompanies the disease. >> she transformed the way we look at it and made it possible for countless people to survive and flourish as a result. i do not know how many presidents have that kind of impact on the way we live our lives. >> just walking around the white
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house grounds, i am constantly reminded about all of the people who have lived there before, and all of the women in particular. >> first ladies, influence and image. a new series on c-span. starting presidents day, february 18. >> next, members of congress react to friday's shooting in connecticut. 27 people died, including 20 children ages 6 and 7. we start with the morning prayer is from the u.s. house and senate. -- prayers from the u.s. house and senate.
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>> give them listen, grace, foresight, and courage.
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it allows us all to move toward. in all that is done on this day, for your glory, amen. the presiding officer: the senate will come to order. the chaplain, dr. barry black, will lead the senate in prayer. the chaplain: let us pray. almighty and everlasting god, in whom we live and move and have our being, as we grieve the loss of life in the newtown , conneticut shooting, show us your way and teach us your path. make us all responsible stewards
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of your most precious gift of time by teaching us to number our days, that we may have hearts of wisdom. may the incomprehensible destruction of lives still framed by springtime remind us of the importance of not delaying in seizing our opportunities to do good. make our lawmakers willing to act promptly, remembering that time is fleeting, and that they shall not pass this way again. bless those who mourn, eternal god, with the comfort of your ve that they may face each new
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day with hope and with the certainty that nothing can destroy the good that has been given them. may they are memories become less painful, as you encircle their lives with your love. we pray in your merciful name. amen. that senator kirk's statement be placed in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: as i was coming to work today i drove past st. peter's grade school on the house side of the hill. and there were a group of students, little kids, who were being escorted by their teacher down the sidewalk and as they walked along i couldn't help but get a flashback to that image that all america remembers from last friday of the children at sandy hook school in
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newtown, connecticut, filing out heading for safety at the firehouse. i don't know that i can look at the faces of these children as their names have been roartd and not think of my own kids when they were that age and especially of my own grandchildren now who were just a little over a year old. but i saw in the eyes of those children what all of us see, an innocence, happiness, an interest in the future and just the greatest dreams in the world. well, in one brutal, debraved -- deprived hometown those dreams ended when that gunman forced way into sandy hook school and shot those poor, innocent children. at that moment some people stepped forward who really became heroes of the day. four teachers, rachel davino, anne marie murphy, lauren rousseau, victor yoa soat pe merry sherlach the school psychologist, and dawn
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hochsprung the principal who walked into the face of this gunman to try to stop him from harming any chirp. we'd like to think any of us would rise to a standard of courage they showed. i hope we will but they did, and in so doing reminded us even those who just go to work every single day can be called on to show bravery. these teachers did. the school psychologist and principal and we hoeo them a great -- owe them a great debt of gratitude as i'm sure all the families in the school feel. we bray for the first victim, nancy lanza and reflect on our responsibility. i thought about it over the weekend, and wroi an article for "the chicago tribune" this morning and here's what it said. what would it take -- what will it fake for a majority of americans to speak out for sensible firearms policy in our nation? it will take more than a congresswoman being shot point
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blank in the face as she gathers for a town meeting in arizona. it will take more than a deranged gunman with 100 magazines spraying bullets into a movie theater in aurora, colorado. it will take more than kids dying with, morning killings on campuses in illinois and texas and virginia and more than the shootings on the streets of chicago, my hometown of east st. louis and so many other cities. sadly, it will take more than 27 victims including 20 children a at sandy hook grade school in connecticut. what it will take is a majority of americans and a majority of thoughtful gun owners and hunters to agree that there must be a reasonable limit on gun ownership and weapons. the supreme court acknowledged that the second amendment rights are not absolute, so can we come together and agree that americans have the right to own
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and use firearms for sport and self-defense with certain limits? we must institute reasonable commonsense limits such as barring those with a history of mental instability, those with a history of violent crime and subject to restraining orders and those whose 2345eu78s have already been placed on a terrorist watch list. they shouldn't own guns. and those straw purchasers who are fencing for drug gangs and other criminal thugs? how about the gun dealers who look the other way when they come to buy those weapons? we have to deal with them realistically and firmly. there are certain classes of weapons that are strictly military. they have no useful purpose in sport, hunting or self-defense. they should not be legally sold in america. the gun that was used at sandy hook grade school in newtown, connecticut, was just such a gun. an ar-15, originally an m-16
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developed for military purposes and then with a clip attached to it that held countless numbers of bullets, he turned them on those little babies, those infants and killed them with that assault weapon. magazine clips with more than ten rounds should be prohibited from civilian use. no one should be allowed to purchase more than two firearms, maybe only one firearm a month. and those who own firearms that are within the reach of children should have protective locks on their weapons. what holds us back are political organizations that are well funded, organized and determined to resist even the most reasonable limitations. there is a close political parallel between the gridlock in washington on dealing with our economy and national debt and the eerie silence in congress as the list of horrific dwb gun crimes grows by the day. i'm encouraged by several of my colleagues who have spoken out today. drad ition traddation --
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traditionally they've been the side of those who opposed any limitation on firearms but they believe after newtown, connecticut, we have to reopen that conversation in a good faith effort to find common ground. too many colleagues shrug their shoulders when votes come to the floor for a vote. they feel duty bound to vote right on every scorecard issue. my wife and i grew up in downstate illinois with families of hunters. we know the rite of passage when a father takes his son or daughter out hunting the first time. i know fun of watching the sun come up on a duck blind and hearing a seasoned hunter calling them over the water. the hunters i know are good people. they love their sport and they hate those who misuse firearms to tryst and -- terrorize and kill. we need these hunters to join with americans who never owned or used a gun to establish a reasonable standard for gun use
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and ownership in this great nation. i was thinking over the weekend how much we have focused on texting and driving, and i looked up the numbers. last year it is estimated that 6,000 americans died because they foolishly were texting while driving. we now have a national campaign to stop texting and driving and we should. 6,000 american lives lost last year we lost 30,000 american lives to gun deaths. to put it in perspective. it's time for to us view safety and ownership of guns as seriously as we do when it comes to safety in the operation of automobiles. until we do, until we come together as a nation, and come forward with reasonable limits on the guns that can be sold, magazines and cartridges that can be sold, even the body armor which i cannot even understand a purpose for in this country, until we do that, the number of victims of gun
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tragedies will continue to grow and the silence of the funerals that follow will be matched by the silence of those in congress who is have the power to change it. it is time for to us step forward in memory of these poor children in newtown, connecticut, their grieving families, these her roik -- heroic teachers and those who reminded us we are all part of the same american family. madam president, i yield the floor. a senator: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: before the senator from illinois leaves the floor, i commend him for his statement statement, first on his nominee for illinois judgeship, something that's been delayed far too long through no fault of the senator from illinois. madam president, this weekend was a very difficult and trying weekend, for our families and
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so many other families, nothing compared to the families in newtown, of course. i pretty much stayed off the phone, spent time with children and grandchildren. made an exception for a couple of phone calls with the distinguished senior senator from illinois. i told him when we come back in a couple of weeks in the new congress, i'll work with him to make sure the senate judiciary committee has full and thorough hearings on the subjects he's just talked about. just as he stated here so eloquently and as he did in his television interviews this weekend. it is the time to have -- the president was absolutely right when he said that there are a number of issues here. obviously the issue of guns is
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one of them. mental health is another. there are several house issues -- several house. several committees will look at that and should. i think the senate judiciary committee has a very particular role to play, and i pledge to the senator from illinois he'll have my complete cooperation in that regard. one of the rare phone calls i made this weekend other than to a couple national law enforcement officials. i thought i'd seen some of the most her risk crime scenes a young man, they just don't even begin -- don't even begin to compare to what the first responders and others, school officials, parents, saw in that elementary school. the memories -- the memory is
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fresh for us, but can you imagine this is a memory for the families, both the adults and the children who died, that's a memory that will never fade, never, ever, ever. i think we ought to show our responsibility to step forward, find out what can be done and agree on it. i -- not as democrats, republicans, liberals, moderates. i believe, madam president, it can be done. i see a time of 5:00 is nearly arrived. but i also see the distinguished senator from maryland on the floor. does -- he wished to speak on the supplemental, i ask unanimous consent it being be returned to him, if we go past
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5:00 they be able to speak on my time on the judicial nominations. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from maryland. mr. cardin: madam president, first let me thank chairman leahy for those words and ex -- in the exchange with senator durbin. i want to express my deepest condolences on behalf of all the people of maryland to the 20 students who lost their lives, the six adults at the hand of a single shooter at sandy hook elementary school in you intown, connecticut. it's heartbreaking to listen to the stories of innocent lives cut cruelly short. the pain and grief of the families and friends of these students and teachers are unimaginable. i just want to echo some of the comments that senator durbin made and senator leahy made. we know that the teachers and the aides put their life on the
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line in order to try to save children. the unbelievable task of the first responders coming to the scene, not knowing what they would find, we send our prayers to all. this is a tragedy beyond words, and i think president obama said it best last night that our hearts are broken. but as senator durbin has said and senator leahy, i particularly want to thank you, we need to take action. congress needs to come together and take action to protect the safety of our children. we must do better. there have been too many episodes in which children's lives and others have been lost that we must figure out ways to do things, to act to prevent these types of tragedies. this conversation must include a discussion about the culture of violence that preemanates our
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culture today, including the glorification of violence to our children and young adults. we see too much of this violence and it has to have an impact on young children. we need to know how we can responsibly deal with this circumstance. must include a discussion of the mental health services provided to americans, including our students. many of us have talked about this in the past. we have to be more aggressive in dealing with the mental health needs of all the people in our community. and as chairman leahy pointed out, we must discuss the issue about the ready access of individuals to weapons. now, i know there are different views in this congress. i must tell you, i don't understand why we need to allow access to military-style assault weapons and ammunition. i strongly support senator
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feinstein's effort to reinstate the expired 1994 ban on assault weapons, including a ban on ammunition magazines that hold more than ten rounds. senator durbin has raised a very valid point. we regulate automobiles, we regulate consumer products, we regulate a lot -- as we should for public safety. and we should regulate firearms for public safety reasons. there's no need for assault weapons to be held by the public. in my view, there's no legitimate reason for a civilian to possess a military-style weapon or to have large-capacity ammunition clips. congress should also examine whether we can strengthen our background check system for gun buyers along with criminal penalties for those who illegally purchase or transfer guns. we need to take a look at safety locks for children. we need to look at those who have multiple purchases. we need to look at the gun show
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purchases. all these i think we should examine to see whether we cannot make our communities safer without infringing upon the legitimate right of individuals to possess guns, sportsmen to be able to use guns for hunting. i think all that obviously will be protected, but we can do a much better job in protecting public safety. we've talked about this before and we need to act. we need to act in a comprehensive way to make our society safer. and i pledge to the chairman of the judiciary committee. i've had the honor of serving on that committee for four years. he's an extremely fair leader. he believes in letting all sides be heard. and i very much appreciate his commitment in so many different areas that have dealt with public safety, and we have great confidence in his leadership on that committee and other committees of the united states senate need to act as it relates a roll call vote
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on the gerqu nomination and a voice vote on the nomination of olguin. two 6-year-old boyce are being buried this week. nominate oah turned six last month, even though he was only six, jack was a new york giants fan. in the days to come, many of the classmes will also be laid to rest, victims of this tragedy too terrible to comprehend. 20 little girls and boys, 20 tineie daughters and sons, sisters, brothers, friends and playmates. 20 children will never grow up to learn to drive, go on that first date, or graduate from high school. 26 -- i'm sorry, mr. president -- 20 six and seven-year-olds will never have the chai tons fall in love, get married or have children of their own.
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noah, jack, charlotte, dylan, madeleine, kath reconciliation bill, chase, jessie, grace, care line, jessica, allison, and james. no words of condolence could possibly ease the pain of families who lost cherished little children. but i hope it's some small comfort that the entire nation mourns with them. my heart, my warm wishes go out to all of those affected by friday's massacre. my thoughts are with the students and faculty of sandy hook who witnessed the violence. newtown and the nation have seen great evil, but we've also seen incredible bravely. in her mine final act on earth, -year-old victoria soto hid her children in closets and cabinets and then sacrificed
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herself to save them. dawn hochsprung, the principal -- forcibly, the word goes, attacked the assailant and he killed her. mary sherr lock, rachel devino, ann marie murphy also died trying to sativeguard the children. these teachers devoted the newtown children how to read, subtract, and how to be good boys and girls. they gave their lives to keep the children safe. they are a source of hope in a hopeless situation. i commend the teachers of sandy hook elementary who didn't hesitate when they saw danger coming. some barricaded their students inside class rooms or hid them in closet preventing even greater loss of life. i thank the first responders who rushed into the school despite the dangernd horrors around
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them, knowing they had a job to do. it's hard to comprehend this type of tragedy let alone recover from it. but in the words of helen keller, and i quote, "although the world is full of suffering, it islso full of overcoming suffering." as the families of newtown mourn, all america mourns with them. we'll stand with them as they overcome the suffering and beginning the healing process. part of the healing process will require congress to examine what can be done prevent more tragedies like the ones in new towrntion connecticut, you a rohr a, colorado, oak creek, which is, which and portland, oregon. these were just fairly recently, mr. president. as president obama said last night, no one law can erase evil, no policy can prevent a determined madman from committing a senseless act of violence. but we need to accept the reality that we're not doing
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enough to protect our citizens. in the coming days and weeks we'll engage in a meaningful conversation and thoughtful debate about how to change laws in culturehat allow this violence to continue to grow. we have no greater responsibility tn keeping our most vulnerable and most precious resource -- our children -- safe. and every idea should be on the table as we discuss how best to do just that.t.t.t.t.t.t.t. mr. mcconnell: mr. president, i want to start by extending my deepest sympathies to the families of the victims of friday's massacre and to the whole community and to thank the first responders and all those who are helping in the aftermath of this darkest of tragedies. three days after the horrors of newtown, we're all still reeling from what happened. anytime there is a shooting like this, we're crushed with sorrow. but there's no he is scraping the fact that the mas the massae
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stands out for it its awfulness. the murder of so many little children and the adults who tried to save them doesn't just break our hearts, it shatters them. the last few days have been searing for all of us. and the days ahead will be, too. over the weekend we began to see the faces of the children and to hear their stories. one parent, robbie parker stood up before the cameras on sat did i and shared with the nation an impromptuual guy of his 6-year-old dart emillie. emily was bright and creative. and very loving, he said. and we marveled at his courage
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and now the funerals, ten of them, this week in one church alone. it's been said many times that no words are adequate to live the agony of a parent like robbie parker. what happened in newtown on friday is something no parent after young child could ever prepare for. but i think president obama spoke for all of us in the very moving meditation he offered last night on the sing layerty of parental love. there is literally nothing we wouldn't do for our kids and that's one of the things that makes this massacre so terrible, and which makes the stories of courage we've heard so inspiring. the young teacher who stood between the gunman and her
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students and lost her life in the process, the principal and the school psychologist who sprung into action and gave their lives, too. as the president said, these luminous acts of self-sacrificing love are the moments that will define this tragedy in the years ahead. because the heroism and the courage that we will never fail to see in the midst of tragedies like this become the starting point to something better and more lasting than the vagaries of this life. they give us the hope we need in the face of so much evil and sorrow. so we stand with the people of newtown today and in the days ahead. we can do nothing to lessen their anguish, but we can let
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them know that we mourn with them. that we share a tiny part of the burden in our own hearts, and that we will lift the victims and their families and the entire community in prayer. scripture says that while now we only know in part in the life to come we shall know even as we are known scripture also says in that day every tear will be wiped away because there will be no more death or sorrow or crying or pain for the former things will have passed away. may the people of newtown and all americans be consoled by this certain hope. may their burdens be lightened
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by the loving care of their neighbors and friends, and even strangers, in the days and weeks ahead. and may this terrible tragedy prompt all of us to cherish the lives we've been given. our female members and friends, and all who surround us in our daily tasks. this is no lasting city, we know. may we pass through it with a little more gratitude and with a firmer determination to live the kind of lives we've been called to mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: i now ask that the united states senate observe a moment of silence in honor of the victims of the andy hook elementary -- of the sandy hook elementary school tragedy.
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[moment of silence]
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>> people kill people. that is the bottom line. weapons are for a reason. >> the second amendment was put into place. you had a six-shooter at the most. i am sure the four fathers of this country were not thinking about assault weapons brigid assault weapons. -- or not thinking about assault weapons. -- we're not thinking about assault weapons. -- with our -- were not thinking about assault weapons. >> i saw ronald reagan close all the hospitals in california.
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there is just not enough done for the mentally ill. >> i am getting rid of my guns. my husband was a police officer. i am getting rid of all of the guns. i do not have the need for them. i do not think it worked out very well for mrs. lanzy. >> the whole problem is being misdirected at guns. every one of these people have been under psychiatric treatment or they have been taking prozac. the pharmaceutical industry. they have 50% of the kids taking prozac. they are creating these monsters. >> they are not background checks. it is your personality.
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is your temperament. if you have a short temper meant, to not carry weapons. i do not carry weapons because i already know i have a short fuse. when they talk about background checks, i could buy as many weapons as i want because i do not have a criminal record. >> more drugs than ever have been handed out to kids. the kid was raised on these drugs. >> these violent video games they sit and play daily.
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the consequences of taking these guns out. it becomes part of the culture. >> my solution is we will have to protect the most innocent of the innocent. you do not start talking about gun control and talking about that crap on capitol hill. that doesn't do anything. we need to arm --
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it is in fighting terrorists. -- it is fighting terrorists. >> i cannot think farming teachers in the school is a good idea. that is pretty irrational. you are just exacerbating the whole situation. in order to stop all of this chaos and terrible stuff, the
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country is so broken now, it is pathetic. >> every school should have a police officer stationed at each school. it should be funded by the federal government. they need to step up and put an officer in every school. >> i have been calling in about all these people. i am guessing that there are a million schools in this country. you have to find a million well- trained, confident policeman to stand for it to 10 hours. >> barack obama is being very hypocritical.
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you are a center of illinois who has one of the worst gang members in the country. every day in the united states, i live in miami, and that was one of the worst cities in the country. the only thing i hear every time a white kid is on the tv, it is national news. bigness. let's talk about all kids, not just white kids. >> one question is whether or not anybody can put forth a good reason for people to have these guns. give me an example of a time when it has come in handy, when it has been a great thing, when it was for the benefit of someone. why are they needed? >> i have a comment about an earlier caller who said she was looking for a good example of why we should have these types of weapons.
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i would like to point to the founding a thief -- of this country. without proper arms, it leaves our people on able to protect themselves from a tyrannical government. that is the purpose. >> my question is, what is a 55- year-old woman going to do with an assault weapon? he never said anything for four full years about assault weapons. these need to change. assault weapons. >> prior to 1968, no one had a background check. there were no restrictions whatsoever. you could order direct wit -- direct mail.
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they will send you a semiautomatic pistol or rifle. the gun laws have changed. i invite everyone to look at the school shootings of 1968 or prior and 51. -- and find one. >> you advertise to these men -- mentally ill people there is nobody who is armed and nobody to stop an intruder with a gun. >> the access our young children have to violent videos is far more a negative influence on them than any guns are. these are the kinds of things that lead to these incidents. >> coming up, a 1998 interview with senator daniel inouye, who died. then, votes cast for president.
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>> tuesday, the senate banking committee examines the practice of the buying or selling of large quantities of stocks. live coverage starting at 9:30 a.m. eastern on c-span 3. >> one of the things that surprised me, i did not conduct a nationwide survey of gone owners, but among people i talked with, i found very often the reaction, your way of thinking before and after you have got a gun is very different. any law-abiding gun owner realizes when he has a gun, it is a huge responsibility.
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if you use this weapon irresponsibly or wrongly, you could get yourself into legal trouble. you could cause unnecessary misery and death to people you did not intend to do harm to. makes you very careful. >> it should. >> for most people, it does. it would make people more careful if they all had to pass some kind of tests before they get a license. you do not always have to with a gun. >> living with guns, a liberal's case for the second amendment. part of four days on c-span 2.
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senator daniel inouye died today at age 88 of a respiratory illness in bethesda, maryland. an interview with the senator from june 30, 1998, in honolulu. poughkeepsie event is part of the japanese-american legacy project. >> the first question is, how did the two of you meet? >> it was after the war. in an organization such as this, you generally got acquainted of men -- with a man of your country, with your neighbors, you may know a few of them. as a general rule, you stayed with in your company can find. after the war, in discussing
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veteran matters with fellow veterans, unavoidable. the leader was -- he was up front, honest, had a good sense of humor. although he knew the charges against him were false and should have been cleared, he kept on working. >> you are known as a very good fighter in europe. what are the factors or
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characteristics? >> i do not know what you mean. we were unsettled -- considered gentle people. something happens to a person. when there is a cause. keep in mind the people who sell forward and volunteer, they are a very special breed. i am not suggestion we were superman or people better than the rest, a coptic christian jen -- a consecration the -- a concentration camp mahood half -- i had to ask myself a question.
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what i have volunteered? to this day, i am not able to get an honest response. i cannot be honest with yes or no. the fact that hundreds upon hundreds volunteered under those conditions is not only historic. it is almost unbelievable. i do not suppose there is any similar chapter in our history where people in large numbers stood up and said we have got to defend a country that is doing us harm. when you look back the life in the camps, there were children standing up before school, pledging allegiance to the flag.
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it is almost beyond comprehension. when you consider the build up of animosity and hatred in certain circles, and you have these men step forward, that is extraordinary. >> i agree. they were extraordinary men. >> they were not brutes in ordinary life. a fun-loving young fellow like all of us. in fact, if you look over the list of those, they are not the huge men. they usually look angelic. [laughter] >> i have known the family for 30 years. i did not know this side of him
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until later on. he was a very gentle man. >> [indiscernible] >> all of us have those problems. [laughter] >> he died last year. i know he really wanted to come to this reunion in particular to see you and his other comrades. what thoughts to you have or words to you have for him and the rest of the family? >> i am really sorry he is not here for us for this reunion. in all likelihood, it is our very last one. the companies will continue to have their annual gathering. when you consider the average age of the men must be about
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77, 5 year from now, the average age will be 82. according to statistics, we do not live forever. this may be our last gathering. i am certain he is happy wherever he is. >> what would you like to see happen? >> nothing extraordinary. our work has been done. if we can leave this place knowing the future is in good hands -- in this convention, you will note the work of the sons and daughters, for example.
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that, in and of itself, should appease us. the work will continue. for generations to come. we are going to have fun. we will not come forth with past revolutions, calling upon the congress to pass this law. we will not do those things. for the most part, the conventions highlights would be the company gathering. the companies will get together and we will be rehashing the war, and the war will get bigger and bigger, and the heroics will get much more valorous. [laughter] >> let's switch gears and talk
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about more your personal history. why do we not start back in 1922. ? why do you not just talk about that for a little bit? >> i was born in 1924. i became aware of the supreme court decision in 1922 rather early in my life. that decision declared that the japanese were not qualified for citizenship. as a result, the effect was that a japanese could not be nationalized. in more practical terms, father, who was born in japan, got his education here, paid his taxes, and could not be nationalized. when he married my mother, who
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was born in hawaii and a citizen, therefore, the moment she got married, she lost her citizenship because of a law that was passed. in 1924, a law was passed in the congress, approved by the president, that said, if a people is to be found on qualify for citizenship, their homeland will not qualify. this was the quarter legislation. in the case of japan, it was singled out. the one country in the world without immigration. if you use this as a background, one can understand why certain levels of animosity developed and existed prior to december 7.
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we, as young people, had no idea about what's going on. >> let's jump forward now. let's talk specifically about your experiences as a young man. 18 years old. >> i was 17. a senior in high school. i was well aware of the events and although our neighbors were very friendly and understanding, when the news of december 7 finally hit me, i realized what had happened. i concluded the end of the world was here.
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after all, the man who piloted those planes look like us, look like me. gounod's? some may have been related -- who knows? some may have been related. it was a difficult time. our neighbors accepted us. they understood the problems that we had. they felt sorry for us we were singled out. i was an employee at the federal government. i was a member of the first aid station. i had been training for over a
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year. we anticipated problems in hawaii. on december 7, there were bomb shelters. it was not anything new. we were already trained for over a year on how to participate in mask engineering and the evacuations. when december 7 came, the station already established. i was put on the payroll as a member of the agency. >> describe what was happening at the agency. >> i have been told i may very likely have picked up the first civilian dead on december 7. what happened in the hysteria of the initial bombing, when the
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anti-aircraft unit went into operation, i think some of the men got so excited, they forgot to put -- forgot to put the timer on. it will burst at a certain height. if plants are coming in, you set it up to that height. -- if planes were coming in, you set it up to that height. many of them in our neighborhood. the station at which i worked was called upon to do the work. i led the team and picked up this elderly japanese lady who was having a breakfast at this time. oblivious to the fact an attack
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was in progress. and astrologist went through the roof and sliced her head. >> do you ever reflect back on the irony in the plane, the pilots were japanese ?
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[stand by]
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generally, the political parties pick their select or reject their elector nominees at their annual pellicle conventions in each election year. those names are submitted by the office of the secretary of state and they are held until the election in november. once we wait and see which candidate has been certified to us, we then call those electors. elect our nominees from the different political parties simply wait to see who the voters vote for as president and vice president, which means in reality, when the voters of north carolina voted this past november, there were actually boating to pick this slate of directors instead of voting directly for the president and
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vice-president. as we moved to the formal meeting of electrons, i would like to introduce our electors to this gathering. the 15 republican electors were assembled here to cast the 15 south carolina electorate votes president and vice-president. as i introduce each elector, would you please rise and remain standing throughout the administration of the oath. we will begin with our two at large collectors, collector at large felice pete of raleigh, and gary terry. not to our district elect doors -- from the first district, from the second district, robert levy, ashley woolard, fourth district, michael esser,
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fifth district, charles barrett, sixth district, david rubin, seventh district, barbara hines, eighth district, don abernathy, ninth district, mary jo shepherd, 10th district, will initially tell -- william shalikto, 12th district, paul penny, 13th district, james polk -- pope. thank you.
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let's give them some applause. [applause] it is now my tremendous pleasure to ask chief justice sarah parker of the north carolina supreme court to administer the oath of office to the members of the electoral college. justice parker has served the people of the north -- of north carolina as a practicing attorney, as a judge on the north carolina court of appeals, and now as chief justice of the north carolina supreme court. justice parker? >> if you would please, please your left hand on the bible and raise your right hand. do you and each of you solemnly and sincerely swear that you will support the constitution of the united states, that you'll be faithful abate true allegiance to a softer line and the constitutional authorities
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that are or which may be status -- established at the governor's wishes, that you will maintain the constitution of a sad state, not inconsistent with the constitution of the united states, to the best of your knowledge and ability, and do you for their sully and sincerely swear that you will execute the duties of the office a lot toward -- of elector for the president and vice president of the united states of america according to the best of your skill and ability, according to law, so help you god? >> i do. >> congratulations to each of you. >> the of having been administered, please be seated. the electoral college will now select its officers and proceed with its business. i open the floor for the nomination of president of the electoral college. i recognize james proctor of the first district for the purpose of nominating and
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electric for the purpose of president of the college. >> madam secretary, i nominate robert levy, the elector from the second district or president of the electoral college. mr. levy is a lifelong republican. he is well versed in the rules of order. he should be more than capable of conducting the business of this meeting. >> ladies and gentlemen, you heard the nomination of elector robert levy of the second district for president of the college. do i hear a second? >> [no audio] >> any other nominations? hearing none, is there a motion to close the nominations? all those in favor of closing the nominations, vote aye. the ayes have it. moving to the election, all
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those in favor of a lot are robert levy of the second district so signify by saying aye. the ayes have it. collector robert levy will become the president of the 56 electoral college. and i asked mr. levy to please step up and take this position and preside over the remainder of the meeting. >> thank you, madame secretary. i thank the college for the honor and privilege of serving as your president today. the floor is now open for the nominations for secretary of the electoral college. i recognize barbara hines of the seventh district for that purpose.
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is there a second? hearing a second -- are there any other nominations? hearing none, do i hear a motion that these nominations be closed? the motion having been made, that the nominations be closed, is there any objection to moving to an immediate vote? hearing none, all those in favor of william shillito as being secretary, say aye. the eyes have it. i ask that mr. schiller auto -- shillito step up here.
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i now open the floor for the nomination of presidential teller and vice presidential teller. i recognize barry terry for that purpose. >> [indiscernible] >> thank you. is there a second to those nominations? i recognize ms. hines. >> [indiscernible] >> are there any other nominations?
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hearing none, is there a motion to close the nominations? ms. hines? okay. is there any objection to clause in the nominations? hearing none, the nominations are closed. all in favor of the nominee please stay aye. all those opposed, saying they -- say nay. their folk -- -- therefore, mary jo shepard has been elected to serve as presidential teller and doreen abernathy has been elected to serve as vice presidential teller. if you would please take your seats at the podium.
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the electoral college of north carolina, having been duly organized, balloting for vice- president and president of the united states will begin. i would like to recognize art pope for the purpose of nominating mitt romney for president of the united states. mr. pope? >> mr. president, members of the electoral college, madam secretary, and my fellow citizens, it is my honor to place the nomination for president of the united states of america to governor mitt romney. governor romney has recognized the results of the 2012 election and has conceded the election and given his congratulations and offered his heartfelt support to president
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obama as president obama continues to lead our nation. as the secretary eloquently explained, it is a vital part of our constitutional government and in the checks and balances of our federal statement -- federal government that each state cast their votes for president. the majority of our citizens voted for the nominee of the republican party, governor mitt romney. governor romney has a long record of service to our nation, public service, a volunteer service, and service in job-creating private enterprise. america has grown and prospered for private enterprise. the term enterprise includes the employers, the owners of the company, but also their employees as they all work together to serve the customer, the people of america. it is necessary that we work together and serve the people in innovative ways to lower the
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costs of a constantly changing world. as a young man, mitt romney graduated from harvard. rather than pursue his career as a lawyer, he chose business. in 1984, he founded bain capital, an investment firm. that is a firm that invested in small businesses and old businesses with the intent to grow them, create, and prosper. indeed, one of the very first investments that bain capital made was a small startup company, an office supply company in a massachusetts. that company grew to have over 2000 bookstores and employ over 90,000 people with the slogan, we got that. that company was staples. to be successful, to grow a business, create and thousands of jobs, to save the customer money, and to give greater value for your shareholder, as mitt romney has done, is a service to america.
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by shareholders, i mean everybody, from the family saving and investing for their children's education, and our major funds that we rely on for our retirement. creating value to private enterprise as part of mitt romney's legacy of service. mitt romney could have been content with a very successful business career, yet brought his life, he also dedicated himself to volunteer service in our nation, to his community, and his church. mitt romney left bain capital to answer our nation's call to help turn around the 2002 celtics of the olympic games. after the olympic games, mitt romney was elected as republican as governor of massachusetts, an overwhelmingly democratic state, by a democratic legislature. he enacted bipartisan reforms to close a multibillion-dollar state deficit without raising taxes, and at the same time,
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improving the education of massachusetts students. as the 2012 nominee for president, mitt romney brought a successful record of public service to the people, private enterprise experience, and principled solutions to meet the challenges our nation faces. the popular vote is over. as mitt romney said in his concession speech, this is a time of great challenges for america, and i pray that president obama will be successful in getting our nation. as a true show of bipartisanship, i was going to quote again. at, this, we cannot risk partisan bickering. our leaders have to reach across the aisle to do the people's work, and we the citizens also have to rise to the occasion. as another step beyond partisan
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bickering, it is my honor to place the nomination for you, the president of the united states, the name of mitt romney. thank you. [applause] >> thank you, mr. pope. is there a second to the nomination for mitt romney as president of the united states? i recognize michael esser of the fourth district to second the nomination. >> i second the nomination for mitt romney as president of the united states. [applause] >> are there any other nominations for president of the united states? hearing none, do i hear a motion that the nominations be closed? mr. rubin? do i have a second? during the second, all those in favor of closing the nominations, please say aye.
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all those opposed, say nay. the nominations are closed. the balloting will proceed to president of the united states of america. will the presidential teller obtain the ballots from the secretary of state, which believe you have, and pass went to each elector -- one to each elector? please mark your ballots for president and the united states in writing with the name of the candidate. please be sure to sign your ballot. what the balloting begins. -- let the balloting began -- begin.
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>> would the presidential teller of mary jo shepherd now collect the ballots from the electors? the secretary might need assistance, she needs it. mr. secretary.
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>> boats have been cast on december 17, 2012. all 15 votes were for mitt romney as president of the united states of america. >> , very much. -- thank you very much. [applause] the electoral college votes have been taken for president of the united states. the results are now in. the floor is now open for
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nomination for vice president of the united states. i would like to recognize at this time james proctor of the first district for the purpose of nominating paul ryan for vice-president of the united states. [applause] >> mr. president, distinguished guests, electors, and i think i speak for all my fellow collectors when i say how honored we all feel to be here today in this historic chamber to participate in this ceremony was designed by our founding fathers to allow for the participation of the states equal and sovran branches of our federal republic or elections for president. i am pleased to nominate for the office of vice-president of the united states congressman paul ryan of wisconsin. congressman ron has been the most forceful and articulate voice capitol hill for a vital
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but simple proposition, that we must balance our federal budget or we will face impending economic disaster. even as we come together here today to certify the results of this election, make no mistake that this is a political battle that this country will fight again. i for one hope that this is not the last time we will hear congressman ryan kos unnamed nominated in this chamber, but regardless of who the messenger -- ryan's name nominated in this chamber, but regardless of who the messenger -- of with a messenger will be, we may face a catastrophe that neither side of the political aisle like to see. in conclusion, i am pleased to nominate congressman ryan of wisconsin or vice president, and i thank you for your time. [applause] >> the chair recognizes doty allen for the purposes of
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seconding the nomination. >> [indiscernible] [applause] >> are there any other nominations for vice-president of the united states of america? hearing none, is there a motion to close the nominations? mr. proctor? ok. is there a second to such motion? hearing a second, all those in favor of closing the nominations for vice-president of the united states, please signify by saying aye. the ayes have it. the nominations are closed. the balloting will proceed for the vice-president of the united states of america. will the vice-presidential
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teller please obtain the ballots?
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>> will the vice-presidential teller please collect the ballots from the electors?
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ok.
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>> the electoral votes of north carolina have been passed on this, the 17th day of december, 2012, through the republican electors, and the result is as follows. the 15 votes cast in the name of paul ryan for vice-president of united states of america. >> thank you. [applause] would secretary marshall please bring forward the certificates of each elector -- each elector will have to sign six copies. i believe we will sign one copy, and then at the end, if the electors will remain seated, we will sign the other five.
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>> the electors having signed a certificate of the vote, at this point i would like to thank the staff of the state capital, the secretary of state's office, and the north carolina republican's staff as well as the north carolina republican party as well as the voters of north carolina for helping make
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this meeting of the electoral college of success. if there is no further business to come before us, i wish to recognize dodi allen for the purpose of making a motion to adjourn. >> [inaudible] >> recognizing don abernathy for the purpose of a second. >> [inaudible] >> all those in favor of adjournment, say aye. >> aye. >> i now turn it over to our distinguished secretary of state, alain marshall. [applause]
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>> thank you for a job well done. ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your service today. i want to thank the participants as well as those of you here to watch history being made. history in this historical room and people watching us across the state through modern technology, this is truly a moment to reflect upon what good citizenship is all about. before everybody does start to leave, let me remind the electorates, if i can ask you to return to your seat so we can pass those extra five. they are crucial and have to be sent to washington posthaste for our cars and congress and everyone else. thank you very much to everyone.
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i hope you have enjoyed yourself, making history, as we have. [laughter] -- [applause] >> today on "washington journal," john fund talks gun control. more about gun control with democratic pennsylvania congressman allyson schwartz. shall talk about the house legislative agenda and ways to avoid the fiscal cliff. after that, marcia howard of the federal fund for states talks about the impact that sequestration could have on states. plus you're e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> today, defense secretary leon
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panetta speaks of the national press club. secretary panetta who visited afghanistan last wednesday will discuss defense policies and the challenges facing the u.s. military. this starts live at 1:00 p.m. eastern on c-span2. monday, the 18 members of ohio costa electoral college cast their electoral votes for president barack obama and vice president joe biden. former ohio gov. ted strickland also served as a presidential elector spoke about the election and the recent school shooting in connecticut. president obama won ohio with 50% of the popular vote over mitt romney who received 48%. this is the 53rd meeting of the ohio and electoral college since statehood in 18 03. courtesy of the ohio channel, this is 40 minutes. >> this is the 53rd meeting of the ohio electoral college.
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i would like to thank all of you for coming here today and will commute to these proceedings. at this time, i would like to ask all who are gathered here today to stand for a moment of silent prayer and reflection for the victims, their families, and our country as we mourn the deaths of the children and school officials in newtown, connecticut. thank you. to lead us through the preliminary matters and to provide us with a welcoming address, i would like to pass over to congresswoman elect joyce baby -- beaty. >> thank you very much.
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we begin with an invocation, and at this time, i like to ask the reverend angela is in -- zimmon to please come to the well. >> let us pray. almighty god, we gather here together today as people from many different faith traditions, yet we share a bond that is deep and enduring. a profound and abiding belief in justice and peace for all of your children, from the rolling hills of new england to the sunny beaches of california and beyond, even the borders of this hallowed land.
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together, today we meet to celebrate this democracy with which you have a blessed us, and we assembled to cast the votes that will elect the next president of these united states of america. we pray that each person casting a vote does so with a pure mind, heart, and sold. seeking the very best and highest good for the people of this great nation. economic stability, moral integrity, and the ability to lead the world as a true example of freedom and fairness. we pray for the president, that he may be strengthened daily by your grace, that he may constantly remember his calling as both a leader of four and a servant of the people, and that
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we, the citizens of these united states, and those that have elected him, maybe his ever constant source of encouragement as he seeks to fulfill his duties and obligations. finally, lord, we ask you to inspire all those who have been entrusted to elected office, that they may search deep within their hearts and find a way to work with one another and with for the good of this country, the world, and the children who come after us. amen. >> please remain standing as the columbus police honor guard now presents the colors. -- relief honor guard now
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presents the colors. >> at this time, i would like to ask state senator and nina turner to come forward and lead us in reciting the pledge of allegiance. >> good afternoon. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america, and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.
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>> finally, please remain standing for our national anthem which will be sunk by miss debbie parker, and please feel free to join in. >> [singing th"the national anthem"] ♪
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[applause] >> thank you, and you may be seated.
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>> good afternoon. it is with great privilege, honor, and pride that i stand here in these chambers to welcome you as we convene our 53rd meeting of the ohio electoral college. to all of our state elected officials, members of the electoral college, guests, and those viewing the proceedings today, i thank you for joining us. today, members of the lot -- of the ohio electoral college will
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cast their vote to elect the president of these united states. as designed by our finding fathers -- our founding and enshrined in the constitution, each state given an electoral votes by the number of congressional members. today, i stand in this well as being honored as one of those to serve in the united states congress. two additional members will have the honor of providing ohio the privilege to cast 18 electoral college votes in favor of the andidate who won our state's general election. as citizens of this great state, our views, our opinions are a valuable, and our 18 electoral college votes helped decide who became president of
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the united states. as a citizen of this state, i am so proud to call ohio home. i joined the 11 million other citizens, the citizens of from 241 cities, 681 villages, and more than 1300 townships -- ohio is called the mother of the presidency. it is a home of eight great a high winds who have become presidents of these -- ohioans who have become a presence of these united states -- william howard taft, james garfield, warren harding, ulysses s. grant, and referred hayes.
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it is my pleasure today to state that today ohios electoral college members will cast their vote to elect president barack obama. the united states constitution, federal law, an ohio law all regard this group of individuals who have organized themselves as ohio's college of electoral votes, according to section 35 05 0.39 of the ohio revised code. it specifies -- section 35050.39 of the ohio revised code. i will now pass the gavel to secretary john huston.
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>> thank you, congresswomen elect beaty. one of the enduring traditions in american democracy is the orderly transition of power, or in this case, the retention of it. this orderly transition of power, particularly as it relates to the power of the presidency, makes america great and unique. it is a tradition that has stood the test of time. it is an honor for me and for all of us to play our role in this respect chapter of our state and nation's history. as required by law, all electors have been notified of the time and place of this meeting. electors had until noon to appear at this meeting of the electoral college, and it should reflect that the time now is at 12:12:00 p.m..
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-- 12:00 p.m. we will call the roll of electors to ascertain whether all members are present. i now ask the state -- the state representative to call the role of the presidential electors. -- the roll of the presidential electors. >> tracy herd, william young, michael friedman, ann blach, william j. healing the ii, kathena heranie, wafde kapachav
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itz -- i beg your pardon -- mark owen, purnell jones jr., grace anne charington, sarah brown clarke, kevin malltech, jeremy van meter, ryan colagar, ted strickland, chris redfern. mr. secretary, the calling of the role is complete. all 18 electors are present. >> the 53rd ohio electoral college -- i asked maureen o'connor, chief justice of the
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ohio supreme court, to come forward and administer the oath of office to the members of this electoral college. >> thank you, secretary. electors, i ask you to stand and raise your right hand. if you will repeat after me -- i solemnly swear that i will support, obey, and defense the constitution of the united states and the constitution and laws of the state of ohio and that i will faithfully discharge the duties of my office as i shall answer and to god -- unto god.
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congratulations. >> thank you, chief justice. i will now entertain the nominations for the chairman of the 53rd ohio collect oral college. this time, i would like to call and weighed capps a cabbage -- on wade kapsikavitch. >> i nominate chris reverend -- redfern. >> i moved a nominations for chairman the coast. -- that nominations for chairman be closed. >> i second that nominations be closed. >> the motion is seconded. all in favor, signify by saying aye. those opposed?
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the ayes have it. all in favor of chris redfern serving as chairman, please signify by saying aye. the ayes have it. chairman chris redfern is elected chairman of the ohio collect oral culture. please accept the ceremonial gavel and preside over the meeting. >> thank you, secretary. welcome. this historic election, the first to be carried by democrat twice in ohio by more than 50% of the vote since franklin
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delano roosevelt, reflects the effort, the work, the diligence of those present in -- and properly those not present. to our friends in the campaign at coming up thank you for your leadership. -- in the campaign, a thank you for your leadership. to everybody across the state, thank you for your support. but like to recognize members of the ohio general assembly and the congressional delegation. i want to personally thank the secretary for participating in this as well as the chief justice of the state of ohio. our effort continues beyond today. as we reminded -- as we were reminded by our reverence opening player, -- prayer, we
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began our work and new. -- anew. on behalf of the men and women of the ohio democratic party and those who supported the campaign of the president, i simply say thank you. with that, like to recognize and bring to the podium the former governor of the state of ohio, gov. ted strickland. -- i would like to recognize and bring to the podium at the former governor of the state of ohio, a governor ted strickland. >> the scriptures remind us that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and love and of sound mind. our country faces many, many difficult challenges. we have witnessed a horror of recent days.
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we have been engaged in foreign wars. we have budget challenges that confront the leadership in washington, even as we meet here today. i believe this is a good day. i believe it is a good day because we are here to celebrate, as the secretary indicated, we are here to celebrate a peaceful election that has resulted in the retention -- it could have been a transfer of power -- but we know in any event, it would have been peaceful and accepted by the american people. that is our form of governance and one that we should honor and protect.
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last night, i was thinking back over my own political career, and i realized that in my political time, i have a won 7 elections, and i have lost five elections. i can tell you that on every election day in which i had been involved, regardless of the outcome, i have considered that event to the -- to be a magnificent event. the campaign for offices in our country, we spend money and run a tv ads and make speeches, and then finally, the people speak. the people speak by collective authority, registering their opinions as to who they choose to lead us, and that is a magnificent, regardless of who
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was the winner or who is the loser. that is why we are here today, to celebrate that, to cast our votes as electors, but we should also remember, i believe, that we are all one family in this great country of ours. we are black and white, we are brown, we are republicans and democrats, we are conservatives and liberals, we are gays and straights, we are from every part of this great country of ours, every region, small town, a large city, rural areas, but there is something that binds americans together that i believe is unique among the nation's of the earth. we are celebrating a part of
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that uniqueness today. as we contemplate the future, let us remember that god has not given us the spirit of fear, but of power and of love and of sound mind. thank you. >> thank you, governor strickland. i now ask for a motion to designate the secretary as the secretary of the permanently organized 53rd organized a vital electoral college. >> mr. chairman, i move that the secretary designated as the secretary of the permanently organized 53rd board -- a high note electoral college. >> the motion has been offered.
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i am moving at the secretary be deemed the secretary of the college. >> i second the motion. >> the mayor of seconds. all those in favor, signified by saying aye. the ayes have it. i declare the secretary of state as the secretary of this college. secretary, would you please return to the podium? >> we electors are about to cast ohio's coats for election of the president and vice president of the united states. the procedures for this are set forth in the 12th amendment of united states constitution. separate votes are to be taken for each office on a separate ballots. after the votes had been cast and counted and the results announced, the electors will sign six original copies of certificates, stating the
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results of the vote. officeretary of state's has prepared certificates in advance of this process. mr. secretary, would you further explain the procedure we will follow today? >> thank you, mr. chairman. according to the 12th amendment of united states constitution and a section 3505.09 of ohio's code, each elector must vote separately for president and vice president. first, electors must find a presidential ballots on of the folders in their desk. each elector will sign the ballots at this time, and my staff will collect the ballots. collect them and deliver them. collect them and deliver them.